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Rxivist combines preprints from bioRxiv with data from Twitter to help you find the papers being discussed in your field. Currently indexing 65,085 bioRxiv papers from 288,430 authors.

Most downloaded bioRxiv papers, all time

in category neuroscience

11,422 results found. For more information, click each entry to expand.

101: The geometry of abstraction in hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex
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Posted to bioRxiv 06 Sep 2018

The geometry of abstraction in hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex
3,726 downloads neuroscience

Silvia Bernardi, Marcus K Benna, Mattia Rigotti, Jérôme Munuera, Stefano Fusi, C Daniel Salzman

The curse of dimensionality plagues models of reinforcement learning and decision-making. The process of abstraction solves this by constructing abstract variables describing features shared by different specific instances, reducing dimensionality and enabling generalization in novel situations. Here we characterized neural representations in monkeys performing a task where a hidden variable described the temporal statistics of stimulus-response-outcome mappings. Abstraction was defined operationally using the generalization performance of neural decoders across task conditions not used for training. This type of generalization requires a particular geometric format of neural representations. Neural ensembles in dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus, and in simulated neural networks, simultaneously represented multiple hidden and explicit variables in a format reflecting abstraction. Task events engaging cognitive operations modulated this format. These findings elucidate how the brain and artificial systems represent abstract variables, variables critical for generalization that in turn confers cognitive flexibility.

102: I TRIED A BUNCH OF THINGS: THE DANGERS OF UNEXPECTED OVERFITTING IN CLASSIFICATION
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Posted to bioRxiv 03 Oct 2016

I TRIED A BUNCH OF THINGS: THE DANGERS OF UNEXPECTED OVERFITTING IN CLASSIFICATION
3,708 downloads neuroscience

Michael Skocik, John Collins, Chloe Callahan-Flintoft, Howard Bowman, Brad Wyble

Machine learning is a powerful set of techniques that has enhanced the abilities of neuroscientists to interpret information collected through EEG, fMRI, MEG, and PET data. With these new techniques come new dangers of overfitting that are not well understood by the neuroscience community. In this article, we use Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers, and genetic algorithms to demonstrate the ease by which overfitting can occur, despite the use of cross validation. We demonstrate that comparable and non-generalizable results can be obtained on informative and non-informative (i.e. random) data by iteratively modifying hyperparameters in seemingly innocuous ways. We recommend a number of techniques for limiting overfitting, such as lock boxes, blind analyses, and pre-registrations. These techniques, although uncommon in neuroscience applications, are common in many other fields that use machine learning, including computer science and physics. Adopting similar safeguards is critical for ensuring the robustness of machine-learning techniques.

103: Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity
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Posted to bioRxiv 29 Feb 2016

Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity
3,690 downloads neuroscience

Hod Dana, Boaz Mohar, Yi Sun, Sujatha Narayan, Andrew Gordus, Jeremy P Hasseman, Getahun Tsegaye, Graham T Holt, Amy Hu, Deepika Walpita, Ronak Patel, John J Macklin, Cornelia I Bargmann, Misha B Ahrens, Eric R Schreiter, Vivek Jayaraman, Loren L Looger, Karel Svoboda, Douglas S Kim

Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging.

104: Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans
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Posted to bioRxiv 08 Feb 2015

Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans
3,673 downloads neuroscience

William J. Tyler, Alyssa M. Boasso, Hailey M. Mortimore, Rhonda S. Silva, Jonathan D. Charlesworth, Michelle A. Marlin, Kirsten Aebersold, Linh Aven, Daniel Z. Wetmore, Sumon K. Pal

We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology in human volunteers under different experimental conditions. In all cases, the TEN involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve (V1/V2) and cervical spinal nerve afferents (C2/C3). Under resting conditions when subjects were not challenged or presented with environmental stimuli, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment conducted under similar resting conditions, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed by a classical fear conditioning paradigm and a series of time-constrained cognitive tasks, TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress.

105: Unsupervised discovery of demixed, low-dimensional neural dynamics across multiple timescales through tensor components analysis
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Posted to bioRxiv 30 Oct 2017

Unsupervised discovery of demixed, low-dimensional neural dynamics across multiple timescales through tensor components analysis
3,622 downloads neuroscience

Alex H Williams, Tony Hyun Kim, Forea Wang, Saurabh Vyas, Stephen I Ryu, Krishna V Shenoy, Mark Schnitzer, Tamara G Kolda, Surya Ganguli

Perceptions, thoughts and actions unfold over millisecond timescales, while learned behaviors can require many days to mature. While recent experimental advances enable large-scale and long-term neural recordings with high temporal fidelity, it remains a formidable challenge to extract unbiased and interpretable descriptions of how rapid single-trial circuit dynamics change slowly over many trials to mediate learning. We demonstrate a simple tensor components analysis (TCA) can meet this challenge by extracting three interconnected low dimensional descriptions of neural data: neuron factors, reflecting cell assemblies; temporal factors, reflecting rapid circuit dynamics mediating perceptions, thoughts, and actions within each trial; and trial factors, describing both long-term learning and trial-to-trial changes in cognitive state. We demonstrate the broad applicability of TCA by revealing insights into diverse datasets derived from artificial neural networks, large-scale calcium imaging of rodent prefrontal cortex during maze navigation, and multielectrode recordings of macaque motor cortex during brain machine interface learning.

106: A self-initiated two-alternative forced choice paradigm for head-fixed mice
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Posted to bioRxiv 08 Sep 2016

A self-initiated two-alternative forced choice paradigm for head-fixed mice
3,613 downloads neuroscience

Fred Marbach, Anthony M Zador

Psychophysical tasks for non-human primates have been instrumental in studying circuits underlying perceptual decision-making. To obtain greater experimental flexibility, these tasks have subsequently been adapted for use in freely moving rodents. However, advances in functional imaging and genetic targeting of neuronal populations have made it critical to develop similar tasks for head-fixed mice. Although head-fixed mice have been trained in two-alternative forced choice tasks before, these tasks were not self-initiated, making it difficult to attribute error trials to perceptual or decision errors as opposed to mere lapses in task engagement. Here, we describe a paradigm for head-fixed mice with three lick spouts, analogous to the well-established 3-port paradigm for freely moving rodents. Mice readily learned to initiate trials on the center spout and performed around 200 self-initiated trials per session, reaching good psychometric performance within two weeks of training. We expect this paradigm will be useful to study the role of defined neural populations in sensory processing and decision-making.

107: Discrete attractor dynamics underlying selective persistent activity in frontal cortex
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Posted to bioRxiv 15 Oct 2017

Discrete attractor dynamics underlying selective persistent activity in frontal cortex
3,594 downloads neuroscience

Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Lorenzo Fontolan, Sandro Romani, Karel Svoboda

Short-term memories link events separated in time, such as past sensation and future actions. Short-term memories are correlated with selective persistent activity, which can be maintained over seconds. In a delayed response task that requires short-term memory, neurons in mouse anterior lateral motor cortex (ALM) show persistent activity that instructs future actions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this persistent activity we combined intracellular and extracellular electrophysiology with optogenetic perturbations and network modeling. During the delay epoch, both membrane potential and population activity of ALM neurons funneled towards discrete endpoints related to specific movement directions. These endpoints were robust to transient shifts in ALM activity caused by optogenetic perturbations. Perturbations occasionally switched the population dynamics to the other endpoint, followed by incorrect actions. Our results are consistent with discrete attractor dynamics underlying short-term memory related to motor planning.

108: Automated long-term recording and analysis of neural activity in behaving animals
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Posted to bioRxiv 30 Nov 2015

Automated long-term recording and analysis of neural activity in behaving animals
3,562 downloads neuroscience

Ashesh K Dhawale, Rajesh Poddar, Evi Kopelowitz, Valentin Normand, Steffen B. E. Wolff, Bence P Ölveczky

Addressing how neural circuits underlie behavior is routinely done by measuring electrical activity from single neurons during experimental sessions. While such recordings yield snapshots of neural dynamics during specified tasks, they are ill-suited for tracking single-unit activity over longer timescales relevant for most developmental and learning processes, or for capturing neural dynamics across different behavioral states. Here we describe an automated platform for continuous long-term recordings of neural activity and behavior in freely moving animals. An unsupervised algorithm identifies and tracks the activity of single units over weeks of recording, dramatically simplifying the analysis of large datasets. Months-long recordings from motor cortex and striatum made and analyzed with our system revealed remarkable stability in basic neuronal properties, such as firing rates and inter-spike interval distributions. Interneuronal correlations and the representation of different movements and behaviors were similarly stable. This establishes the feasibility of high-throughput long-term extracellular recordings in behaving animals.

109: Exploring the effect of microdosing psychedelics on creativity in an open-label natural setting
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Posted to bioRxiv 08 Aug 2018

Exploring the effect of microdosing psychedelics on creativity in an open-label natural setting
3,559 downloads neuroscience

Luisa Prochazkova, Dominique P Lippelt, Lorenza S Colzato, Martin Kuchar, Zsuzsika Sjoerds, Bernhard Hommel

Introduction: Recently popular sub-perceptual doses of psychedelic substances such as truffles, referred to as microdosing, allegedly have multiple beneficial effects including creativity and problem solving performance, potentially through targeting serotonergic 5-HT2A receptors and promoting cognitive flexibility, crucial to creative thinking. Nevertheless, enhancing effects of microdosing remain anecdotal, and in the absence of quantitative research on microdosing psychedelics it is impossible to draw definitive conclusions on that matter. Here, our main aim was to quantitatively explore the cognitive-enhancing potential of microdosing psychedelics in healthy adults. Methods: During a microdosing event organized by the Dutch Psychedelic Society, we examined the effects of psychedelic truffles (which were later analyzed to quantify active psychedelic alkaloids) on two creativity-related problem-solving tasks: the Picture Concept Task assessing convergent thinking, and the Alternative Uses Task assessing divergent thinking. A short version of the Ravens Progressive Matrices task assessed potential changes in fluid intelligence. We tested once before taking a microdose and once while the effects were manifested. Results: We found that both convergent and divergent thinking performance was improved after a non-blinded microdose, whereas fluid intelligence was unaffected. Conclusion: While this study provides quantitative support for the cognitive enhancing properties of microdosing psychedelics, future research has to confirm these preliminary findings in more rigorous placebo-controlled study designs. Based on these preliminary results we speculate that psychedelics might affect cognitive metacontrol policies by optimizing the balance between cognitive persistence and flexibility. We hope this study will motivate future microdosing studies with more controlled designs to test this hypothesis.

110: The 100 Euro Lab: A 3-D Printable Open Source Platform For Fluorescence Microscopy, Optogenetics And Accurate Temperature Control During Behaviour Of Zebrafish, Drosophila And C. elegans
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Posted to bioRxiv 31 Mar 2017

The 100 Euro Lab: A 3-D Printable Open Source Platform For Fluorescence Microscopy, Optogenetics And Accurate Temperature Control During Behaviour Of Zebrafish, Drosophila And C. elegans
3,542 downloads neuroscience

Andre Maia Chagas, Lucia Prieto Godino, Aristides B Arrenberg, Tom Baden

Small, genetically tractable species such as larval zebrafish, Drosophila or C. elegans have become key model organisms in modern neuroscience. In addition to their low maintenance costs and easy sharing of strains across labs, one key appeal is the possibility to monitor single or groups of animals in a behavioural arena while controlling the activity of select neurons using optogenetic or thermogenetic tools. However, the purchase of a commercial solution for these types of experiments, including an appropriate camera system as well as a controlled behavioural arena can be costly. Here, we present a low-cost and modular open-source alternative called FlyPi. Our design is based on a 3-D printed mainframe, a Raspberry Pi computer and high-definition camera system as well as Arduino-based optical and thermal control circuits. Depending on the configuration, FlyPi can be assembled for well under 100 Euros and features optional modules for LED-based fluorescence microscopy and optogenetic stimulation as well as a Peltier-based temperature stimulator for thermogenetics. The complete version with all modules costs ~200 Euros, or substantially less if the user is prepared to shop around. All functions of FlyPi can be controlled through a custom-written graphical user interface. To demonstrate FlyPis capabilities we present its use in a series of state-of-the-art neurogenetics experiments. In addition, we demonstrate FlyPis utility as a medical diagnostic tool as well as a teaching aid at Neurogenetics courses held at several African universities. Taken together, the low cost and modular nature as well as fully open design of FlyPi make it a highly versatile tool in a range of applications, including the classroom, diagnostic centres and research labs.

111: Evolving super stimuli for real neurons using deep generative networks
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jan 2019

Evolving super stimuli for real neurons using deep generative networks
3,526 downloads neuroscience

Carlos R Ponce, Will Xiao, Peter Schade, Till S Hartmann, Gabriel Kreiman, Margaret S Livingstone

Finding the best stimulus for a neuron is challenging because it is impossible to test all possible stimuli. Here we used a vast, unbiased, and diverse hypothesis space encoded by a generative deep neural network model to investigate neuronal selectivity in inferotemporal cortex without making any assumptions about natural features or categories. A genetic algorithm, guided by neuronal responses, searched this space for optimal stimuli. Evolved synthetic images evoked higher firing rates than even the best natural images and revealed diagnostic features, independently of category or feature selection. This approach provides a way to investigate neural selectivity in any modality that can be represented by a neural network and challenges our understanding of neural coding in visual cortex.

112: Div-Seq: A single nucleus RNA-Seq method reveals dynamics of rare adult newborn neurons in the CNS
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Posted to bioRxiv 27 Mar 2016

Div-Seq: A single nucleus RNA-Seq method reveals dynamics of rare adult newborn neurons in the CNS
3,525 downloads neuroscience

Naomi Habib, Yinqing Li, Matthias Heidenreich, Lukasz Swiech, John J Trombetta, Feng Zhang, Aviv Regev

Transcriptomes of individual neurons provide rich information about cell types and dynamic states. However, it is difficult to capture rare dynamic processes, such as adult neurogenesis, because isolation from dense adult tissue is challenging, and markers for each phase are limited. Here, we developed Div-Seq, which combines Nuc-Seq, a scalable single nucleus RNA-Seq method, with EdU-mediated labeling of proliferating cells. We first show that Nuc-Seq can sensitively identify closely related cell types within the adult hippocampus. We apply Div-Seq to track transcriptional dynamics of newborn neurons in an adult neurogenic region in the hippocampus. Finally, we find rare adult newborn GABAergic neurons in the spinal cord, a non-canonical neurogenic region. Taken together, Nuc-Seq and Div-Seq open the way for unbiased analysis of any complex tissue.

113: Surgically disconnected temporal pole exhibits resting functional connectivity with remote brain regions
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Posted to bioRxiv 15 Apr 2017

Surgically disconnected temporal pole exhibits resting functional connectivity with remote brain regions
3,513 downloads neuroscience

David E Warren, Matthew J Sutterer, Joel Bruss, Taylor J Abel, Andrew Jones, Hiroto Kawasaki, Michelle Voss, Martin Cassell, Matthew A Howard, Daniel Tranel

Functional connectivity, as measured by resting-state fMRI, has proven a powerful method for studying brain systems in the context of behavior, development, and disease states. However, the relationship of functional connectivity to structural connectivity remains unclear. If functional connectivity relies on structural connectivity, then anatomical isolation of a brain region should eliminate functional connectivity with other brain regions. We tested this by measuring functional connectivity of the surgically disconnected temporal pole in resection patients (N=5; mean age 37; 2F, 3M). Functional connectivity was evaluated based on coactivation of whole-brain fMRI data with the average low-frequency BOLD signal from disconnected tissue in each patient. In sharp contrast to our prediction, we observed significant functional connectivity between the disconnected temporal pole and remote brain regions in each disconnection case. These findings raise important questions about the neural bases of functional connectivity measures derived from the fMRI BOLD signal.

114: Variational Autoencoder: An Unsupervised Model for Modeling and Decoding fMRI Activity in Visual Cortex
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Nov 2017

Variational Autoencoder: An Unsupervised Model for Modeling and Decoding fMRI Activity in Visual Cortex
3,490 downloads neuroscience

Kuan Han, Haiguang Wen, Junxing Shi, Kun-Han Lu, Yizhen Zhang, Zhongming Liu

Goal-driven and feedforward-only convolutional neural networks (CNN) have been shown to be able to predict and decode cortical responses to natural images or videos. Here, we explored an alternative deep neural network, variational auto-encoder (VAE), as a computational model of the visual cortex. We trained a VAE with a five-layer encoder and a five-layer decoder to learn visual representations from a diverse set of unlabeled images. Inspired by the "free-energy" principle in neuroscience, we modeled the brain's bottom-up and top-down pathways using the VAE's encoder and decoder, respectively. Following such conceptual relationships, we used VAE to predict or decode cortical activity observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from three human subjects passively watching natural videos. Compared to CNN, VAE resulted in relatively lower accuracies for predicting the fMRI responses to the video stimuli, especially for higher-order ventral visual areas. However, VAE offered a more convenient strategy for decoding the fMRI activity to reconstruct the video input, by first converting the fMRI activity to the VAE's latent variables, and then converting the latent variables to the reconstructed video frames through the VAE's decoder. This strategy was more advantageous than alternative decoding methods, e.g. partial least square regression, by reconstructing both the spatial structure and color of the visual input. Findings from this study support the notion that the brain, at least in part, bears a generative model of the visual world.

115: What exactly is 'N' in cell culture and animal experiments?
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Posted to bioRxiv 02 Sep 2017

What exactly is 'N' in cell culture and animal experiments?
3,481 downloads neuroscience

Stanley E Lazic, Charlie J Clarke-Williams, Marcus R. Munafò

Biologists establish the existence of experimental effects by applying treatments or interventions to biological entities or units, such as people, animals, slice preparations, or cells. When done appropriately, independent replication of the entity-intervention pair contributes to the sample size (N) and forms the basis of statistical inference. However, sometimes the appropriate entity-intervention pair may not be obvious, and the wrong choice can make an experiment worthless. We surveyed a random sample of published animal experiments from 2011 to 2016 where interventions were applied to parents but effects examined in the offspring, as regulatory authorities have provided clear guidelines on replication with such designs. We found that only 22% of studies (95% CI = 17% to 29%) replicated the correct entity-intervention pair and thus made valid statistical inferences. Approximately half of the studies (46%, 95% CI = 38% to 53%) had pseudoreplication while 32% (95% CI = 26% to 39%) provided insufficient information to make a judgement. Pseudoreplication artificially inflates the sample size, leading to more false positive results and inflating the apparent evidence supporting a scientific claim. It is hard for science to advance when so many experiments are poorly designed and analysed. We argue that distinguishing between biological units, experimental units, and observational units clarifies where replication should occur, describe the criteria for genuine replication, and provide guidelines for designing and analysing in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments.

116: Discovering event structure in continuous narrative perception and memory
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Posted to bioRxiv 14 Oct 2016

Discovering event structure in continuous narrative perception and memory
3,464 downloads neuroscience

Christopher Baldassano, Janice Chen, Asieh Zadbood, Jonathan W. Pillow, Uri Hasson, Kenneth A Norman

During realistic, continuous perception, humans automatically segment experiences into discrete events. Using a novel model of neural event dynamics, we investigate how cortical structures generate event representations during continuous narratives, and how these events are stored and retrieved from long-term memory. Our data-driven approach enables identification of event boundaries and event correspondences across datasets without human-generated stimulus annotations, and reveals that different regions segment narratives at different timescales. We also provide the first direct evidence that narrative event boundaries in high-order areas (overlapping the default mode network) trigger encoding processes in the hippocampus, and that this encoding activity predicts pattern reinstatement during recall. Finally, we demonstrate that these areas represent abstract, multimodal situation models, and show anticipatory event reinstatement as subjects listen to a familiar narrative. Our results provide strong evidence that brain activity is naturally structured into semantically meaningful events, which are stored in and retrieved from long-term memory.

117: The population dynamics of a canonical cognitive circuit
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Posted to bioRxiv 09 Jan 2019

The population dynamics of a canonical cognitive circuit
3,415 downloads neuroscience

Rishidev Chaudhuri, Berk Gerçek, Biraj Pandey, Adrien Peyrache, Ila Fiete

The brain constructs distributed representations of key low-dimensional variables. These variables may be external stimuli or internal constructs of quantities relevant for survival, such as a sense of one's location in the world. We consider that the high-dimensional population-level activity vectors are the fundamental representational currency of a neural circuit, and these vectors trace out a low-dimensional manifold whose dimension and topology matches those of the represented variable. This manifold perspective -- applied to the mammalian head direction circuit across rich waking behaviors and sleep -- enables powerful inferences about circuit representation and mechanism, including: Direct visualization and blind discovery that the network represents a one-dimensional circular variable across waking and REM sleep; fully unsupervised decoding of the coded variable; stability and attractor dynamics in the representation; the discovery of new dynamical trajectories during sleep; the limiting role of external rather than internal noise in the fidelity of memory states; and the conclusion that the circuit is set up to integrate velocity inputs according to classical continuous attractor models.

118: An open resource for transdiagnostic research in pediatric mental health and learning disorders
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Posted to bioRxiv 13 Jun 2017

An open resource for transdiagnostic research in pediatric mental health and learning disorders
3,398 downloads neuroscience

Lindsay M. Alexander, Jasmine Escalera, Lei Ai, Charissa Andreotti, Karina Febre, Alexander Mangone, Natan Vega Potler, Nicolas Langer, Alexis Alexander, Meagan Kovacs, Shannon Litke, Bridget O’Hagan, Jennifer Andersen, Batya Bronstein, Anastasia Bui, Marijayne Bushey, Henry Butler, Victoria Castagna, Nicolas Camacho, Elisha Chan, Danielle Citera, Jon Clucas, Samantha Cohen, Sarah Dufek, Megan Eaves, Brian Fradera, Judith Gardner, Natalie Grant-Villegas, Gabriella Green, Camille Gregory, Emily Hart, Shana Harris, Megan Horton, Danielle Kahn, Katherine Kabotyanski, Bernard Karmel, Simon P. Kelly, Kayla Kleinman, Bonhwang Koo, Eliza Kramer, Elizabeth Lennon, Catherine Lord, Ginny Mantello, Amy Margolis, Kathleen R. Merikangas, Michael P Milham, Giuseppe Minniti, Rebecca Neuhaus, Alexandra Nussbaum, Yael Osman, Lucas C Parra, Ken R. Pugh, Amy Racanello, Anita Restrepo, Tian Saltzman, Batya Septimus, Russell Tobe, Rachel Waltz, Anna Williams, Anna Yeo, F. Xavier Castellanos, Arno Klein, Tomas Paus, Bennett L. Leventhal, R Cameron Craddock, Harold S. Koplewicz

Technological and methodological innovations are equipping researchers with unprecedented capabilities for detecting and characterizing pathologic processes in the developing human brain. As a result, ambitions to achieve clinically useful tools to assist in the diagnosis and management of mental health and learning disorders are gaining momentum. To this end, it is critical to accrue large-scale multimodal datasets that capture a broad range of commonly encountered clinical psychopathology. The Child Mind Institute has launched the Healthy Brain Network (HBN), an ongoing initiative focused on creating and sharing a biobank of data from 10,000 New York area participants (ages 5-21). The HBN Biobank houses data about psychiatric, behavioral, cognitive, and lifestyle phenotypes, as well as multimodal brain imaging (resting and naturalistic viewing fMRI, diffusion MRI, morphometric MRI), electroencephalography, eye-tracking, voice and video recordings, genetics, and actigraphy. Here, we present the rationale, design and implementation of HBN protocols. We describe the first data release (n = 664) and the potential of the biobank to advance related areas (e.g., biophysical modeling, voice analysis).

119: Mapping the human brain's cortical-subcortical functional network organization
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Posted to bioRxiv 19 Oct 2017

Mapping the human brain's cortical-subcortical functional network organization
3,394 downloads neuroscience

Jie Lisa Ji, Marjolein Spronk, Kaustubh Kulkarni, Grega Repovš, Alan Anticevic, Michael W Cole

Understanding complex systems such as the human brain requires characterization of the system's architecture across multiple levels of organization - from neurons, to local circuits, to brain regions, and ultimately large-scale brain networks. Here we focus on characterizing the human brain's comprehensive large-scale network organization, as it provides an overall framework for the organization of all other levels. We leveraged the Human Connectome Project dataset to identify network communities across cortical regions, replicating well-known networks and revealing several novel but robust networks, including a left-lateralized language network. We expanded these cortical networks to subcortex, revealing 288 highly-organized subcortical segments that take part in forming whole-brain functional networks. This whole-brain network atlas - released as an open resource for the neuroscience community - places all brain structures across both cortex and subcortex in a single large-scale functional framework, substantially advancing existing atlases to provide a brain-wide functional network characterization in humans.

120: High-throughput mapping of long-range neuronal projection using in situ sequencing
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Posted to bioRxiv 03 Apr 2018

High-throughput mapping of long-range neuronal projection using in situ sequencing
3,391 downloads neuroscience

Xiaoyin Chen, Yu-Chi Sun, Huiqing Zhan, Justus M Kebschull, Stephan Fischer, Katherine Matho, Z. Josh Huang, Jesse Gillis, Anthony M Zador

Understanding neural circuits requires deciphering interactions among myriad cell types defined by spatial organization, connectivity, gene expression, and other properties. Resolving these cell types requires both single neuron resolution and high throughput, a challenging combination with conventional methods. Here we introduce BARseq, a multiplexed method based on RNA barcoding for mapping projections of thousands of spatially resolved neurons in a single brain, and relating those projections to other properties such as gene or Cre expression. Mapping the projections to 11 areas of 3579 neurons in mouse auditory cortex using BARseq confirmed the laminar organization of the three top classes (IT, PT-like and CT) of projection neurons. In depth analysis uncovered a novel projection type restricted almost exclusively to transcriptionally-defined subtypes of IT neurons. By bridging anatomical and transcriptomic approaches at cellular resolution with high throughput, BARseq can potentially uncover the organizing principles underlying the structure and formation of neural circuits.

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