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Rxivist combines preprints from bioRxiv with data from Twitter to help you find the papers being discussed in your field. Currently indexing 84,901 bioRxiv papers from 365,186 authors.

Most downloaded bioRxiv papers, since beginning of last month

in category bioinformatics

7,951 results found. For more information, click each entry to expand.

1: Integrated analyses of single-cell atlases reveal age, gender, and smoking status associations with cell type-specific expression of mediators of SARS-CoV-2 viral entry and highlights inflammatory programs in putative target cells
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Posted to bioRxiv 20 Apr 2020

Integrated analyses of single-cell atlases reveal age, gender, and smoking status associations with cell type-specific expression of mediators of SARS-CoV-2 viral entry and highlights inflammatory programs in putative target cells
5,936 downloads bioinformatics

Christoph Muus, Malte D. Luecken, Gokcen Eraslan, Avinash Waghray, Graham Heimberg, Lisa Sikkema, Yoshihiko Kobayashi, Eeshit Dhaval Vaishnav, Ayshwarya Subramanian, Christopher Smilie, Karthik Jagadeesh, Elizabeth Thu Duong, Evgenij Fiskin, Elena Torlai Triglia, Meshal Ansari, Peiwen Cai, Brian Lin, Justin Buchanan, Sijia Chen, Jian Shu, Adam L. Haber, Hattie Chung, Daniel T Montoro, Taylor Adams, Hananeh Aliee, J. Samuel, Allon Zaneta Andrusivova, Ilias Angelidis, Orr Ashenberg, Kevin Bassler, Christophe Bécavin, Inbal Benhar, Joseph Bergenstråhle, Ludvig Bergenstråhle, Liam Bolt, Emelie Braun, Linh T Bui, Mark Chaffin, Evgeny Chichelnitskiy, Joshua Chiou, Thomas M Conlon, Michael S Cuoco, Marie Deprez, David S. Fischer, Astrid Gillich, Joshua Gould, Minzhe Guo, Austin J Gutierrez, Arun C Habermann, Tyler Harvey, Peng He, Xiaomeng Hou, Lijuan Hu, Alok Jaiswal, Peiyong Jiang, Theodoros Kapellos, Christin S Kuo, Ludvig Larsson, Michael A. Leney-Greene, Kyungtae Lim, Monika Litviňuková, Ji Lu, Leif S Ludwig, Wendy Luo, Henrike Maatz, Elo Madissoon, Lira Mamanova, Kasidet Manakongtreecheep, Charles-Hugo Marquette, Ian Mbano, Alexi Marie McAdams, Ross J Metzger, Ahmad N. Nabhan, Sarah K. Nyquist, Lolita Penland, Olivier B. Poirion, Sergio Poli, CanCan Qi, Rachel Queen, Daniel Reichart, Ivan Rosas, Jonas Schupp, Rahul Sinha, Rene V Sit, Dorothee Diogo, Michal Slyper, Neal Smith, Alex Sountoulidis, Maximilian Strunz, Dawei Sun, Carlos Talavera-Lopez, Peng Tan, Jessica Tantivit, Kyle J. Travaglini, Nathan R. Tucker, Katherine Vernon, Marc H Wadsworth, Julia Waldman, Xiuting Wang, Wenjun Yan, William Zhao, Carly G. K. Ziegler, The NHLBI LungMAP Consortium, The Human Cell Atlas Lung Biological Network

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, creates an urgent need for identifying molecular mechanisms that mediate viral entry, propagation, and tissue pathology. Cell membrane bound angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and associated proteases, transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and Cathepsin L (CTSL), were previously identified as mediators of SARS-CoV2 cellular entry. Here, we assess the cell type-specific RNA expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and CTSL through an integrated analysis of 107 single-cell and single-nucleus RNA-Seq studies, including 22 lung and airways datasets (16 unpublished), and 85 datasets from other diverse organs. Joint expression of ACE2 and the accessory proteases identifies specific subsets of respiratory epithelial cells as putative targets of viral infection in the nasal passages, airways, and alveoli. Cells that co-express ACE2 and proteases are also identified in cells from other organs, some of which have been associated with COVID-19 transmission or pathology, including gut enterocytes, corneal epithelial cells, cardiomyocytes, heart pericytes, olfactory sustentacular cells, and renal epithelial cells. Performing the first meta-analyses of scRNA-seq studies, we analyzed 1,176,683 cells from 282 nasal, airway, and lung parenchyma samples from 164 donors spanning fetal, childhood, adult, and elderly age groups, associate increased levels of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and CTSL in specific cell types with increasing age, male gender, and smoking, all of which are epidemiologically linked to COVID-19 susceptibility and outcomes. Notably, there was a particularly low expression of ACE2 in the few young pediatric samples in the analysis. Further analysis reveals a gene expression program shared by ACE2+TMPRSS2+ cells in nasal, lung and gut tissues, including genes that may mediate viral entry, subtend key immune functions, and mediate epithelial-macrophage cross-talk. Amongst these are IL6, its receptor and co-receptor, IL1R, TNF response pathways, and complement genes. Cell type specificity in the lung and airways and smoking effects were conserved in mice. Our analyses suggest that differences in the cell type-specific expression of mediators of SARS-CoV-2 viral entry may be responsible for aspects of COVID-19 epidemiology and clinical course, and point to putative molecular pathways involved in disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. ### Competing Interest Statement N.K. was a consultant to Biogen Idec, Boehringer Ingelheim, Third Rock, Pliant, Samumed, NuMedii, Indaloo, Theravance, LifeMax, Three Lake Partners, Optikira and received non-financial support from MiRagen. All of these outside the work reported. J.L. is a scientific consultant for 10X Genomics Inc A.R. is a co-founder and equity holder of Celsius Therapeutics, an equity holder in Immunitas, and an SAB member of ThermoFisher Scientific, Syros Pharmaceuticals, Asimov, and Neogene Therapeutics O.R.R., is a co-inventor on patent applications filed by the Broad Institute to inventions relating to single cell genomics applications, such as in PCT/US2018/060860 and US Provisional Application No. 62/745,259. A.K.S. compensation for consulting and SAB membership from Honeycomb Biotechnologies, Cellarity, Cogen Therapeutics, Orche Bio, and Dahlia Biosciences. S.A.T. was a consultant at Genentech, Biogen and Roche in the last three years. F.J.T. reports receiving consulting fees from Roche Diagnostics GmbH, and ownership interest in Cellarity Inc. L.V. is funder of Definigen and Bilitech two biotech companies using hPSCs and organoid for disease modelling and cell based therapy.

2: Single-cell RNA expression profiling of ACE2, the receptor of SARS-CoV-2
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Posted to bioRxiv 26 Jan 2020

Single-cell RNA expression profiling of ACE2, the receptor of SARS-CoV-2
3,396 downloads bioinformatics

Yu Zhao, Zixian Zhao, Yujia Wang, Yueqing Zhou, Yu Ma, Wei Zuo

A novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December of 2019. According to WHO report, this new coronavirus has resulted in 76,392 confirmed infections and 2,348 deaths in China by 22 February, 2020, with additional patients being identified in a rapidly growing number internationally. SARS-CoV-2 was reported to share the same receptor, Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), with SARS-CoV. Here based on the public database and the state-of-the-art single-cell RNA-Seq technique, we analyzed the ACE2 RNA expression profile in the normal human lungs. The result indicates that the ACE2 virus receptor expression is concentrated in a small population of type II alveolar cells (AT2). Surprisingly, we found that this population of ACE2-expressing AT2 also highly expressed many other genes that positively regulating viral entry, reproduction and transmission. This study provides a biological background for the epidemic investigation of the COVID-19, and could be informative for future anti-ACE2 therapeutic strategy development. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

3: Computational analysis suggests putative intermediate animal hosts of the SARS-CoV-2
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Apr 2020

Computational analysis suggests putative intermediate animal hosts of the SARS-CoV-2
2,915 downloads bioinformatics

Peng Chu, Zheng Zhou, Zhichen Gao, Ruiqi Cai, Sijin Wu, Zhaolin Sun, Shuyuan Chen, Yongliang Yang

The authors have withdrawn their manuscript whilst they wish to perform additional experiments to validate their conclusions further. Therefore, the authors do not wish this work to be cited as reference for the project. If you have any questions, please contact the corresponding author for more details. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

4: log(x+1)* and log(1+x)*
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Posted to bioRxiv 19 May 2020

log(x+1)* and log(1+x)*
2,302 downloads bioinformatics

A. Sina Booeshaghi, Lior Pachter

Single-cell RNA-seq technologies have been successfully employed over the past decade to generate many high resolution cell atlases. These have proved invaluable in recent efforts aimed at understanding the cell type specificity of host genes involved in SARS-CoV-2 infections. While single-cell atlases are based on well-sampled highly-expressed genes, many of the genes of interest for understanding SARS-CoV-2 can be expressed at very low levels. Common assumptions underlying standard single-cell analyses don't hold when examining low-expressed genes, with the result that standard workflows can produce misleading results. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

5: Benchmarking atlas-level data integration in single-cell genomics
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Posted to bioRxiv 23 May 2020

Benchmarking atlas-level data integration in single-cell genomics
1,997 downloads bioinformatics

Malte D. Luecken, Maren Büttner, Kridsadakorn Chaichoompu, Anna Danese, Marta Interlandi, Michaela F. Müller, Daniel C. Strobl, Luke Zappia, Martin Dugas, Maria Colomé-Tatché, Fabian J. Theis

Cell atlases often include samples that span locations, labs, and conditions, leading to complex, nested batch effects in data. Thus, joint analysis of atlas datasets requires reliable data integration. Choosing a data integration method is a challenge due to the difficulty of defining integration success. Here, we benchmark 38 method and preprocessing combinations on 77 batches of gene expression, chromatin accessibility, and simulation data from 23 publications, altogether representing >1.2 million cells distributed in nine atlas-level integration tasks. Our integration tasks span several common sources of variation such as individuals, species, and experimental labs. We evaluate methods according to scalability, usability, and their ability to remove batch effects while retaining biological variation. Using 14 evaluation metrics, we find that highly variable gene selection improves the performance of data integration methods, whereas scaling pushes methods to prioritize batch removal over conservation of biological variation. Overall, BBKNN, Scanorama, and scVI perform well, particularly on complex integration tasks; Seurat v3 performs well on simpler tasks with distinct biological signals; and methods that prioritize batch removal perform best for ATAC-seq data integration. Our freely available reproducible python module can be used to identify optimal data integration methods for new data, benchmark new methods, and improve method development. ### Competing Interest Statement F.J.T. reports receiving consulting fees from Roche Diagnostics GmbH and Cellarity Inc., and ownership interest in Cellarity, Inc. and Dermagnostix

6: Comparative analyses of SAR-CoV2 genomes from different geographical locations and other coronavirus family genomes reveals unique features potentially consequential to host-virus interaction and pathogenesis
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Posted to bioRxiv 21 Mar 2020

Comparative analyses of SAR-CoV2 genomes from different geographical locations and other coronavirus family genomes reveals unique features potentially consequential to host-virus interaction and pathogenesis
1,811 downloads bioinformatics

Rahila Sardar, Deepshikha Satish, Shweta Birla, Dinesh Gupta

The ongoing pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2). We have performed an integrated sequence-based analysis of SARS-CoV2 genomes from different geographical locations in order to identify its unique features absent in SARS-CoV and other related coronavirus family genomes, conferring unique infection, facilitation of transmission, virulence and immunogenic features to the virus. The phylogeny of the genomes yields some interesting results. Systematic gene level mutational analysis of the genomes has enabled us to identify several unique features of the SARS-CoV2 genome, which includes a unique mutation in the spike surface glycoprotein (A930V (24351C>T)) in the Indian SARS-CoV2, absent in other strains studied here. We have also predicted the impact of the mutations in the spike glycoprotein function and stability, using computational approach. To gain further insights into host responses to viral infection, we predict that antiviral host-miRNAs may be controlling the viral pathogenesis. Our analysis reveals nine host miRNAs which can potentially target SARS-CoV2 genes. Interestingly, the nine miRNAs do not have targets in SARS and MERS genomes. Also, hsa-miR-27b is the only unique miRNA which has a target gene in the Indian SARS-CoV2 genome. We also predicted immune epitopes in the genomes.

7: SARS-CoV-2 spike protein predicted to form stable complexes with host receptor protein orthologues from mammals
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Posted to bioRxiv 01 May 2020

SARS-CoV-2 spike protein predicted to form stable complexes with host receptor protein orthologues from mammals
1,648 downloads bioinformatics

SD Lam, N Bordin, VP Waman, HM Scholes, Paul Ashford, N Sen, L van Dorp, C Rauer, NL Dawson, CSM Pang, M Abbasian, I Sillitoe, SJL Edwards, F Fraternali, Jon G. Lees, JM Santini, Christine Orengo

SARS-CoV-2 has a zoonotic origin and was transmitted to humans via an undetermined intermediate host, leading to infections in humans and other mammals. To enter host cells, the viral spike protein (S-protein) binds to its receptor, ACE2, and is then processed by TMPRSS2. Whilst receptor binding contributes to the viral host range, S-protein:ACE2 complexes from other animals have not been investigated widely. To predict infection risks, we modelled S-protein:ACE2 complexes from 215 vertebrate species, calculated their relative energies, correlated these energies to COVID-19 infection data, and analysed structural interactions. We predict that known mutations are more detrimental in ACE2 than TMPRSS2. Finally, we demonstrate phylogenetically that human SARS-CoV-2 strains have been isolated in animals. Our results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 can infect a broad range of mammals, but not fish, birds or reptiles. Susceptible animals could serve as reservoirs of the virus, necessitating careful ongoing animal management and surveillance. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

8: Clinical Knowledge Graph Integrates Proteomics Data into Clinical Decision-Making
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Posted to bioRxiv 10 May 2020

Clinical Knowledge Graph Integrates Proteomics Data into Clinical Decision-Making
1,469 downloads bioinformatics

Alberto Santos, Ana R. Colaço, Annelaura B. Nielsen, Lili Niu, Philipp E Geyer, Fabian Coscia, Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen, Filip Mundt, Lars Juhl Jensen, Matthias Mann

The promise of precision medicine is to deliver personalized treatment based on the unique physiology of each patient. This concept was fueled by the genomic revolution, but it is now evident that integrating other types of omics data, like proteomics, into the clinical decision-making process will be essential to accomplish precision medicine goals. However, quantity and diversity of biomedical data, and the spread of clinically relevant knowledge across myriad biomedical databases and publications makes this exceptionally difficult. To address this, we developed the Clinical Knowledge Graph (CKG), an open source platform currently comprised of more than 16 million nodes and 220 million relationships to represent relevant experimental data, public databases and the literature. The CKG also incorporates the latest statistical and machine learning algorithms, drastically accelerating analysis and interpretation of typical proteomics workflows. We use several biomarker studies to illustrate how the CKG may support, enrich and accelerate clinical decision-making. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

9: Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 viral diversity within and across hosts
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Posted to bioRxiv 13 May 2020

Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 viral diversity within and across hosts
1,180 downloads bioinformatics

Palash Sashittal, Yunan Luo, Jian Peng, Mohammed El-Kebir

In light of the current COVID-19 pandemic, there is an urgent need to accurately infer the evolutionary and transmission history of the virus to inform real-time outbreak management, public health policies and mitigation strategies. Current phylogenetic and phylodynamic approaches typically use consensus sequences, essentially assuming the presence of a single viral strain per host. Here, we analyze 621 bulk RNA sequencing samples and 7,540 consensus sequences from COVID-19 patients, and identify multiple strains of the virus, SARS-CoV-2, in four major clades that are prevalent within and across hosts. In particular, we find evidence for (i) within-host diversity across phylogenetic clades, (ii) putative cases of recombination, multi-strain and/or superinfections as well as (iii) distinct strain profiles across geographical locations and time. Our findings and algorithms will facilitate more detailed evolutionary analyses and contact tracing that specifically account for within-host viral diversity in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic as well as future pandemics. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

10: COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine design using reverse vaccinology and machine learning
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Posted to bioRxiv 21 Mar 2020

COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine design using reverse vaccinology and machine learning
1,143 downloads bioinformatics

Edison Ong, Mei U Wong, Anthony Huffman, Yongqun He

To ultimately combat the emerging COVID-19 pandemic, it is desired to develop an effective and safe vaccine against this highly contagious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Our literature and clinical trial survey showed that the whole virus, as well as the spike (S) protein, nucleocapsid (N) protein, and membrane (M) protein, have been tested for vaccine development against SARS and MERS. However, these vaccine candidates might lack the induction of complete protection and have safety concerns. We then applied the Vaxign reverse vaccinology tool and the newly developed Vaxign-ML machine learning tool to predict COVID-19 vaccine candidates. By investigating the entire proteome of SARS-CoV-2, six proteins, including the S protein and five non-structural proteins (nsp3, 3CL-pro, and nsp8-10), were predicted to be adhesins, which are crucial to the viral adhering and host invasion. The S, nsp3, and nsp8 proteins were also predicted by Vaxign-ML to induce high protective antigenicity. Besides the commonly used S protein, the nsp3 protein has not been tested in any coronavirus vaccine studies and was selected for further investigation. The nsp3 was found to be more conserved among SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV than among 15 coronaviruses infecting human and other animals. The protein was also predicted to contain promiscuous MHC-I and MHC-II T-cell epitopes, and linear B-cell epitopes localized in specific locations and functional domains of the protein. By applying reverse vaccinology and machine learning, we predicted potential vaccine targets for effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine development. We then propose that an “Sp/Nsp cocktail vaccine” containing a structural protein(s) (Sp) and a non-structural protein(s) (Nsp) would stimulate effective complementary immune responses.

11: GALA: gap-free chromosome-scale assembly with long reads
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Posted to bioRxiv 16 May 2020

GALA: gap-free chromosome-scale assembly with long reads
1,022 downloads bioinformatics

Mohamed Awad, Xiangchao Gan

High-quality genome assembly has wide applications in genetics and medical studies. However, it is still very challenging to achieve gap-free chromosome-scale assemblies using current workflows of long-read platforms. Here we propose a chromosome-by-chromosome assembly strategy implemented through the multiple-layer computer graph which identifies mis-assemblies within preliminary assemblies or chimeric raw reads and partitions the data into chromosome-scale linkage groups. The subsequent independent assembly of each linkage group generates gap-free assembly free from the mis-assembly errors which usually plague existing workflows. This flexible framework also allows us to integrate data from various technologies, such as Pacbio, Nanopore, Hi-C, and the genetic map, to generate gap-free chromosome-scale assembly. We de novo assembled C. elegans and A. thaliana genomes using GALA with combined Pacbio and Nanopore sequening data from publicly available datasets. We also demonstrated its applicability with a gap-free assembly of two chromosomes in the human genome. In addition, GALA showed promising performance for Pacbio high-fidelity long reads. Our method enables straightforward assembly of genomes with multiple data sources and multiple computational tools, overcoming barriers that at present restrict the application of de novo genome assembly technology. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

12: Joint probabilistic modeling of paired transcriptome and proteome measurements in single cells
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Posted to bioRxiv 10 May 2020

Joint probabilistic modeling of paired transcriptome and proteome measurements in single cells
1,009 downloads bioinformatics

Adam Gayoso, Zoë Steier, Romain Lopez, Jeffrey Regier, Kristopher L Nazor, Aaron Streets, Nir Yosef

The paired measurement of RNA and surface protein abundance in single cells with CITE-seq is a promising approach to connect transcriptional variation with cell phenotypes and functions. However, each data modality exhibits unique technical biases, making it challenging to conduct a joint analysis and combine these two views into a unified representation of cell state. Here we present Total Variational Inference (totalVI), a framework for the joint probabilistic analysis of paired RNA and protein data from single cells. totalVI probabilistically represents the data as a composite of biological and technical factors such as limited sensitivity of the RNA data, background in the protein data, and batch effects. To evaluate totalVI, we performed CITE-seq on immune cells from murine spleen and lymph nodes with biological replicates and with different antibody panels measuring over 100 surface proteins. With this dataset we demonstrate that totalVI provides a cohesive solution for common analysis tasks like the integration of datasets with matched or unmatched protein panels, dimensionality reduction, clustering, evaluation of correlations between molecules, and differential expression testing. totalVI enables scalable, end-to-end analysis of paired RNA and protein data from single cells and is available as open-source software. ### Competing Interest Statement K.L.N. is an employee of BioLegend Inc.

13: Density-Preserving Data Visualization Unveils Dynamic Patterns of Single-Cell Transcriptomic Variability
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Posted to bioRxiv 14 May 2020

Density-Preserving Data Visualization Unveils Dynamic Patterns of Single-Cell Transcriptomic Variability
1,002 downloads bioinformatics

Ashwin Narayan, Bonnie Berger, Hyunghoon Cho

Nonlinear data-visualization methods, such as t-SNE and UMAP, have become staple tools for summarizing the complex transcriptomic landscape of single cells in 2D or 3D. However, existing approaches neglect the local density of data points in the original space, often resulting in misleading visualizations where densely populated subpopulations of cells are given more visual space even if they account for only a small fraction of transcriptional diversity within the dataset. We present den-SNE and densMAP, our density-preserving visualization tools based on t-SNE and UMAP, respectively, and demonstrate their ability to facilitate more accurate visual interpretation of single-cell RNA-seq data. On recently published datasets, our methods newly reveal significant changes in transcriptomic variability within a range of biological processes, including cancer, immune cell specialization in human, and the developmental trajectory of C. elegans. Our methods are readily applicable to visualizing high-dimensional data in other scientific domains. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

14: Chemically-informed Analyses of Metabolomics Mass Spectrometry Data with Qemistree
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 May 2020

Chemically-informed Analyses of Metabolomics Mass Spectrometry Data with Qemistree
959 downloads bioinformatics

Anupriya Tripathi, Yoshiki Vázquez-Baeza, Julia M. Gauglitz, Mingxun Wang, Kai Dührkop, Mélissa Nothias-Esposito, Deepa D. Acharya, M. Ernst, J. J. J. van der Hooft, Qiyun Zhu, Daniel McDonald, Antonio Gonzalez, Jo Handelsman, Markus Fleischauer, Marcus Ludwig, Sebastian Böcker, L.-F. Nothias, Rob Knight, P. C. Dorrestein

Untargeted mass spectrometry is employed to detect small molecules in complex biospecimens, generating data that are difficult to interpret. We developed Qemistree, a data exploration strategy based on the hierarchical organization of molecular fingerprints predicted from fragmentation spectra, represented in the context of sample metadata and chemical ontologies. By expressing molecular relationships as a tree, we can apply ecological tools, designed around the relatedness of DNA sequences, to study chemical composition. ### Competing Interest Statement Mingxun Wang is a founder of Ometa Labs LLC. Pieter C. Dorrestein is a scientific advisor for Sirenas LLC. Kai Dührkop, Marcus Ludwig, Markus Fleischauer and Sebastian Böcker are founders of Bright Giant GmbH.

15: Cellpose: a generalist algorithm for cellular segmentation
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Posted to bioRxiv 03 Feb 2020

Cellpose: a generalist algorithm for cellular segmentation
902 downloads bioinformatics

Carsen Stringer, Tim Wang, Michalis Michaelos, Marius Pachitariu

Many biological applications require the segmentation of cell bodies, membranes and nuclei from microscopy images. Deep learning has enabled great progress on this problem, but current methods are specialized for images that have large training datasets. Here we introduce a generalist, deep learning-based segmentation method called Cellpose, which can precisely segment cells from a wide range of image types and does not require model retraining or parameter adjustments. We trained Cellpose on a new dataset of highly-varied images of cells, containing over 70,000 segmented objects. We also demonstrate a 3D extension of Cellpose which reuses the 2D model and does not require 3D-labelled data. To support community contributions to the training data, we developed software for manual labelling and for curation of the automated results, with optional direct upload to our data repository. Periodically retraining the model on the community-contributed data will ensure that Cellpose improves constantly.

16: Potential inhibitors for 2019-nCoV coronavirus M protease from clinically approved medicines
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Posted to bioRxiv 29 Jan 2020

Potential inhibitors for 2019-nCoV coronavirus M protease from clinically approved medicines
848 downloads bioinformatics

Xin Liu, Xiu-Jie Wang

Starting from December 2019, a novel coronavirus, later named 2019-nCoV, was found to cause severe and rapid pandemic in China. Basing on the structural information, we have predicted a list of commercial medicines which may function as inhibitors for 2019-nCoV by targeting its main protease Mpro. These drugs may also be effective for other coronaviruses with similar Mpro binding sites and pocket structures.

17: Evidence for host-dependent RNA editing in the transcriptome of SARS-CoV-2
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Posted to bioRxiv 03 Mar 2020

Evidence for host-dependent RNA editing in the transcriptome of SARS-CoV-2
821 downloads bioinformatics

Salvatore Di Giorgio, Filippo Martignano, Maria Gabriella Torcia, Giorgio Mattiuz, Silvestro G. Conticello

The COVID-19 outbreak has become a global health risk and understanding the response of the host to the SARS-CoV-2 virus will help to contrast the disease. Editing by host deaminases is an innate restriction process to counter viruses, and it is not yet known whether it operates against Coronaviruses. Here we analyze RNA sequences from bronchoalveolar lavage fluids derived from infected patients. We identify nucleotide changes that may be signatures of RNA editing: Adenosine-to-Inosine changes from ADAR deaminases and Cytosine-to-Uracil changes from APOBEC ones. A mutational analysis of genomes from different strains of human-hosted Coronaviridae reveals mutational patterns compatible to those observed in the transcriptomic data. Our results thus suggest that both APOBECs and ADARs are involved in Coronavirus genome editing, a process that may shape the fate of both virus and patient. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

18: PICRUSt2: An improved and customizable approach for metagenome inference
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Posted to bioRxiv 15 Jun 2019

PICRUSt2: An improved and customizable approach for metagenome inference
799 downloads bioinformatics

Gavin M Douglas, Vincent J. Maffei, Jesse Zaneveld, Svetlana N Yurgel, James R Brown, Christopher M Taylor, Curtis Huttenhower, Morgan G I Langille

One major limitation of microbial community marker gene sequencing is that it does not provide direct information on the functional composition of sampled communities. Here, we present PICRUSt2 (<https://github.com/picrust/picrust2>), which expands the capabilities of the original PICRUSt method[1][1] to predict the functional potential of a community based on marker gene sequencing profiles. This updated method and implementation includes several improvements over the previous algorithm: an expanded database of gene families and reference genomes, a new approach now compatible with any OTU-picking or denoising algorithm, and novel phenotype predictions. Upon evaluation, PICRUSt2 was more accurate than PICRUSt1 and other current approaches overall. PICRUSt2 is also now more flexible and allows the addition of custom reference databases. We highlight these improvements and also important caveats regarding the use of predicted metagenomes, which are related to the inherent challenges of analyzing metagenome data in general. [1]: #ref-1

19: CheckV: assessing the quality of metagenome-assembled viral genomes
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Posted to bioRxiv 08 May 2020

CheckV: assessing the quality of metagenome-assembled viral genomes
798 downloads bioinformatics

Stephen Nayfach, Antonio P. Camargo, Emiley A. Eloe-Fadrosh, Simon Roux, Nikos C. Kyrpides

Over the last several years, metagenomics has enabled the assembly of millions of new viral sequences that have vastly expanded our knowledge of Earth's viral diversity. However, these sequences range from small fragments to complete genomes and no tools currently exist for estimating their quality. To address this problem, we developed CheckV, which is an automated pipeline for estimating the completeness of viral genomes as well as the identification and removal of non-viral regions found on integrated proviruses. After validating the approach on mock datasets, CheckV was applied to large and diverse viral genome collections, including IMG/VR and the Global Ocean Virome, revealing that the majority of viral sequences were small fragments, with just 3.6% classified as high-quality (i.e. > 90% completeness) or complete genomes. Additionally, we found that removal of host contamination significantly improved identification of auxiliary metabolic genes and interpretation of viral-encoded functions. We expect CheckV will be broadly useful for all researchers studying and reporting viral genomes assembled from metagenomes. CheckV is freely available at: http://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/CheckV. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

20: TBtools - an integrative toolkit developed for interactive analyses of big biological data
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Posted to bioRxiv 27 Mar 2018

TBtools - an integrative toolkit developed for interactive analyses of big biological data
764 downloads bioinformatics

Chengjie Chen, Hao Chen, Yi Zhang, Hannah R. Thomas, Margaret H Frank, Yehua He, Rui Xia

The rapid development of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques has led biology into the big-data era. Data analyses using various bioinformatics tools rely on programming and command-line environments, which are challenging and time-consuming for most wet-lab biologists. Here, we present TBtools (a Toolkit for Biologists integrating various biological data handling tools), a stand-alone software with a user-friendly interface. The toolkit incorporates over 100 functions, which are designed to meet the increasing demand for big-data analyses, ranging from bulk sequence processing to interactive data visualization. A wide variety of graphs can be prepared in TBtools, with a new plotting engine (“JIGplot”) developed to maximum their interactive ability, which allows quick point-and-click modification to almost every graphic feature. TBtools is a platform-independent software that can be run under all operating systems with Java Runtime Environment 1.6 or newer. It is freely available to non-commercial users at <https://github.com/CJ-Chen/TBtools/releases>.

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