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Rxivist combines preprints from bioRxiv with data from Twitter to help you find the papers being discussed in your field. Currently indexing 89,516 bioRxiv papers from 383,511 authors.

Most downloaded bioRxiv papers, since beginning of last month

87,387 results found. For more information, click each entry to expand.

1: Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag
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Posted to bioRxiv 31 Jan 2020

Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag
18,317 downloads evolutionary biology

Prashant Pradhan, Ashutosh Kumar Pandey, Akhilesh Mishra, Parul Gupta, Praveen Kumar Tripathi, Manoj Balakrishnan Menon, James Gomes, Perumal Vivekanandan, Bishwajit Kundu

This paper has been withdrawn by its authors. They intend to revise it in response to comments received from the research community on their technical approach and their interpretation of the results. If you have any questions, please contact the corresponding author.

2: SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine Development Enabled by Prototype Pathogen Preparedness
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Posted to bioRxiv 11 Jun 2020

SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine Development Enabled by Prototype Pathogen Preparedness
16,289 downloads immunology

Kizzmekia S. Corbett, Darin Edwards, Sarah R. Leist, Olubukola M. Abiona, Seyhan Boyoglu-Barnum, Rebecca A Gillespie, Sunny Himansu, Alexandra Schäfer, Cynthia T. Ziwawo, Anthony T. DiPiazza, Kenneth H. Dinnon, Sayda M. Elbashir, Christine A. Shaw, Angela Woods, Ethan J Fritch, David R. Martinez, Kevin W. Bock, Mahnaz Minai, Bianca M. Nagata, Geoffrey B. Hutchinson, Kapil Bahl, Dario Garcia-Dominguez, LingZhi Ma, Isabella Renzi, Wing-Pui Kong, Stephen D. Schmidt, Lingshu Wang, Yi Zhang, Laura J Stevens, Emily Phung, Lauren A. Chang, Rebecca J. Loomis, Nedim Emil Altaras, Elisabeth Narayanan, Mihir Metkar, Vlad Presnyak, Catherine Liu, Mark K. Louder, Wei Shi, Kwanyee Leung, Eun Sung Yang, Ande West, Kendra L Gully, Nianshuang Wang, Daniel Wrapp, Nicole A. Doria-Rose, Guillaume Stewart-Jones, Hamilton Bennett, Martha C. Nason, Tracy J. Ruckwardt, Jason S. McLellan, Mark R. Denison, James D. Chappell, Ian N Moore, Kaitlyn M. Morabito, John R. Mascola, Ralph S. Baric, Andrea Carfi, Barney Graham

A SARS-CoV-2 vaccine is needed to control the global COVID-19 public health crisis. Atomic-level structures directed the application of prefusion-stabilizing mutations that improved expression and immunogenicity of betacoronavirus spike proteins. Using this established immunogen design, the release of SARS-CoV-2 sequences triggered immediate rapid manufacturing of an mRNA vaccine expressing the prefusion-stabilized SARS-CoV-2 spike trimer (mRNA-1273). Here, we show that mRNA-1273 induces both potent neutralizing antibody and CD8 T cell responses and protects against SARS-CoV-2 infection in lungs and noses of mice without evidence of immunopathology. mRNA-1273 is currently in a Phase 2 clinical trial with a trajectory towards Phase 3 efficacy evaluation. ### Competing Interest Statement K.S.C., N.W., J.S.M., and B.S.G. are inventors on International Patent Application No. WO/2018/081318 entitled Prefusion Coronavirus Spike Proteins and Their Use. K.S.C., O.M.A., G.B.H., N.W., D.W., J.S.M, and B.S.G. are inventors on US Patent Application No. 62/972,886 entitled 2019-nCoV Vaccine. R.S.B. filed an invention report for the SARS-CoV-2 MA virus (UNC ref. #18752).

3: ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccination prevents SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in rhesus macaques
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Posted to bioRxiv 13 May 2020

ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccination prevents SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in rhesus macaques
14,689 downloads microbiology

Neeltje van Doremalen, Teresa Lambe, Alexandra Spencer, Sandra Belij-Rammerstorfer, Jyothi N. Purushotham, Julia R. Port, Victoria Avanzato, Trenton Bushmaker, Amy Flaxman, Marta Ulaszewska, Friederike Feldmann, Elizabeth R. Allen, Hannah Sharpe, Jonathan Schulz, Myndi Holbrook, Atsushi Okumura, Kimberly Meade-White, Lizzette Pérez-Pérez, Cameron Bissett, Ciaran Gilbride, Brandi N. Williamson, Rebecca Rosenke, Dan Long, Alka Ishwarbhai, Reshma Kailath, Louisa Rose, Susan Morris, Claire Powers, Jamie Lovaglio, Patrick W. Hanley, Dana Scott, Greg Saturday, Emmie de Wit, Sarah C. Gilbert, Vincent J. Munster

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in December 20191,2 and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic3. Vaccines are an essential countermeasure urgently needed to control the pandemic4. Here, we show that the adenovirus-vectored vaccine ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, encoding the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, is immunogenic in mice, eliciting a robust humoral and cell-mediated response. This response was not Th2 dominated, as demonstrated by IgG subclass and cytokine expression profiling. A single vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 induced a humoral and cellular immune response in rhesus macaques. We observed a significantly reduced viral load in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and respiratory tract tissue of vaccinated animals challenged with SARS-CoV-2 compared with control animals, and no pneumonia was observed in vaccinated rhesus macaques. Importantly, no evidence of immune-enhanced disease following viral challenge in vaccinated animals was observed. ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 is currently under investigation in a phase I clinical trial. Safety, immunogenicity and efficacy against symptomatic PCR-positive COVID-19 disease will now be assessed in randomised controlled human clinical trials. ### Competing Interest Statement SCG is a board member of Vaccitech and named as an inventor on a patent covering use of ChAdOx1-vectored vaccines and a patent application covering a SARS-CoV-2 (nCoV-19) vaccine. Teresa Lambe is named as an inventor on a patent application covering a SARS-CoV-2 (nCoV-19) vaccine. The remaining authors declare no competing interests.

4: Spike mutation pipeline reveals the emergence of a more transmissible form of SARS-CoV-2
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Posted to bioRxiv 30 Apr 2020

Spike mutation pipeline reveals the emergence of a more transmissible form of SARS-CoV-2
13,138 downloads evolutionary biology

Bette T. Korber, WM Fischer, S Gnanakaran, H Yoon, J Theiler, W Abfalterer, B Foley, EE Giorgi, Tanmoy Bhattacharya, MD Parker, DG Partridge, CM Evans, TM Freeman, Thushan I. de Silva, on behalf of the Sheffield COVID-19 Genomics Group, CC LaBranche, David Montefiori

We have developed an analysis pipeline to facilitate real-time mutation tracking in SARS-CoV-2, focusing initially on the Spike (S) protein because it mediates infection of human cells and is the target of most vaccine strategies and antibody-based therapeutics. To date we have identified fourteen mutations in Spike that are accumulating. Mutations are considered in a broader phylogenetic context, geographically, and over time, to provide an early warning system to reveal mutations that may confer selective advantages in transmission or resistance to interventions. Each one is evaluated for evidence of positive selection, and the implications of the mutation are explored through structural modeling. The mutation Spike D614G is of urgent concern; after beginning to spread in Europe in early February, when introduced to new regions it repeatedly and rapidly becomes the dominant form. Also, we present evidence of recombination between locally circulating strains, indicative of multiple strain infections. These finding have important implications for SARS-CoV-2 transmission, pathogenesis and immune interventions. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

5: Different pattern of pre-existing SARS-COV-2 specific T cell immunity in SARS-recovered and uninfected individuals
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Posted to bioRxiv 27 May 2020

Different pattern of pre-existing SARS-COV-2 specific T cell immunity in SARS-recovered and uninfected individuals
12,337 downloads immunology

Nina Le Bert, Anthony T Tan, Kamini Kunasegaran, Christine Y. L. Tham, Morteza Hafezi, Adeline Chia, Melissa Chng, Meiyin Lin, Nicole Tan, Martin Linster, Wan Ni Chia, Mark I-Cheng Chen, Lin-Fa Wang, Eng Eong Ooi, Shirin Kalimuddin, Paul Anantharajal Tambyah, Jenny Guek-Hong Low, Yee-Joo Tan, Antonio Bertoletti

Memory T cells induced by previous infections can influence the course of new viral infections. Little is known about the pattern of SARS-CoV-2 specific pre-existing memory T cells in human. Here, we first studied T cell responses to structural (nucleocapsid protein, NP) and non-structural (NSP-7 and NSP13 of ORF1) regions of SARS-CoV-2 in convalescent from COVID-19 (n=24). In all of them we demonstrated the presence of CD4 and CD8 T cells recognizing multiple regions of the NP protein. We then show that SARS-recovered patients (n=23), 17 years after the 2003 outbreak, still possess long-lasting memory T cells reactive to SARS-NP, which displayed robust cross-reactivity to SARS-CoV-2 NP. Surprisingly, we observed a differential pattern of SARS-CoV-2 specific T cell immunodominance in individuals with no history of SARS, COVID-19 or contact with SARS/COVID-19 patients (n=18). Half of them (9/18) possess T cells targeting the ORF-1 coded proteins NSP7 and 13, which were rarely detected in COVID-19- and SARS-recovered patients. Epitope characterization of NSP7-specific T cells showed recognition of protein fragments with low homology to "common cold" human coronaviruses but conserved among animal betacoranaviruses. Thus, infection with betacoronaviruses induces strong and long-lasting T cell immunity to the structural protein NP. Understanding how pre-existing ORF-1-specific T cells present in the general population impact susceptibility and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is of paramount importance for the management of the current COVID-19 pandemic. ### Competing Interest Statement A.B. is a cofounder of Lion TCR, a biotech company developing T cell receptors for treatment of virus-related diseases and cancers. None of the other authors has any competing interest related to the study.

6: Detection dogs as a help in the detection of COVID-19: Can the dog alert on COVID-19 positive persons by sniffing axillary sweat samples? Proof-of-concept study
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Jun 2020

Detection dogs as a help in the detection of COVID-19: Can the dog alert on COVID-19 positive persons by sniffing axillary sweat samples? Proof-of-concept study
11,533 downloads animal behavior and cognition

Dominique Grandjean, Riad Sarkis, Jean-Pierre Tourtier, Clothilde Julien-Lecocq, Aymeric Benard, Vinciane Roger, Eric Levesque, Eric Bernes-Luciani, Bruno Maestracci, Pascal Morvan, Eric Gully, David Berceau-Falancourt, Jean-Luc Pesce, Bernard Lecomte, Pierre Haufstater, Gregory Herin, Joaquin Cabrera, Quentin Muzzin, Capucine Gallet, Hélène Bacqué, Jean-Marie Broc, Leo Thomas, Anthony Lichaa, Georges Moujaes, Michele Saliba, Aurore Kuhn, Mathilde Galey, Benoit Berthail, Lucien Lapeyre, Olivier Méreau, Marie-Nicolas Matteï, Audrey Foata, Louisa Bey, Anne-Sophie Philippe, Paul Abassi, Ferri Pisani, Marlène Delarbre, Jean-Marc Orsini, Anthoni Capelli, Steevens Renault, Karim Bachir, Anthony Kovinger, Eric Comas, Aymeric Stainmesse, Erwan Etienne, Sébastien Voeltzel, Sofiane Mansouri, Marlène Berceau-Falancourt, Brice Leva, Frederic Faure, Aimé Dami, Marc Antoine Costa, Jean-Jacques Tafanelli, Jean-Benoit Luciani, Jean-Jacques Casalot, Lary Charlet, Eric Ruau, Mario Issa, Carine Grenet, Christophe Billy, Loic Desquilbet

The aim of this study is to evaluate if the sweat produced by COVID-19 persons (SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive) has a different odour for trained detection dogs than the sweat produced by non COVID-19 persons. The study was conducted on 3 sites, following the same protocol procedures, and involved a total of 18 dogs. A total of 198 armpits sweat samples were obtained from different hospitals. For each involved dog, the acquisition of the specific odour of COVID-19 sweat samples required from one to four hours, with an amount of positive samples sniffing ranging from four to ten. For this proof of concept, we kept 8 dogs of the initial group (explosive detection dogs and colon cancer detection dogs), who performed a total of 368 trials, and will include the other dogs in our future studies as their adaptation to samples scenting takes more time. The percentages of success of the dogs to find the positive sample in a line containing several other negative samples or mocks (2 to 6) were 100p100 for 4 dogs, and respectively 83p100, 84p100, 90p100 and 94p100 for the others, all significantly different from the percentage of success that would be obtained by chance alone. We conclude that there is a very high evidence that the armpits sweat odour of COVID-19+ persons is different, and that dogs can detect a person infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

7: Breaking the next Cryo-EM resolution barrier - Atomic resolution determination of proteins!
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Posted to bioRxiv 22 May 2020

Breaking the next Cryo-EM resolution barrier - Atomic resolution determination of proteins!
9,318 downloads biophysics

Ka Man Yip, Niels Fischer, Elham Paknia, Ashwin Chari, Holger Stark

Single particle cryo-EM is a powerful method to solve the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. The technological development of electron microscopes, detectors, automated procedures in combination with user friendly image processing software and ever-increasing computational power have made cryo-EM a successful and largely expanding technology over the last decade. At resolutions better than 4 Å , atomic model building starts becoming possible but the direct visualization of true atomic positions in protein structure determination requires significantly higher (< 1.5 Å ) resolution, which so far could not be attained by cryo-EM. The direct visualization of atom positions is essential for understanding protein-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms and to study drug- binding and -interference with protein function. Here we report a 1.25 Å resolution structure of apoferritin obtained by cryo-EM with a newly developed electron microscope providing unprecedented structural details. Our apoferritin structure has almost twice the 3D information content of the current world record reconstruction (at 1.54 Å resolution). For the first time in cryo-EM we can visualize individual atoms in a protein, see density for hydrogen atoms and single atom chemical modifications. Beyond the nominal improvement in resolution we can also show a significant improvement in quality of the cryo-EM density map which is highly relevant for using cryo-EM in structure-based drug design. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

8: Systemic and mucosal antibody secretion specific to SARS-CoV-2 during mild versus severe COVID-19
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Posted to bioRxiv 23 May 2020

Systemic and mucosal antibody secretion specific to SARS-CoV-2 during mild versus severe COVID-19
7,424 downloads immunology

Carlo Cervia, Jakob Nilsson, Yves Zurbuchen, Alan Valaperti, Jens Schreiner, Aline Wolfensberger, Miro E. Raeber, Sarah Adamo, Marc Emmenegger, Sara Hasler, Philipp P. Bosshard, Elena De Cecco, Esther Bächli, Alain Rudiger, Melina Stüssi-Helbling, Lars C. Huber, Annelies S. Zinkernagel, Dominik J. Schaer, Adriano Aguzzi, Ulrike Held, Elsbeth Probst-Müller, Silvana K. Rampini, Onur Boyman

Background: Infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes an acute illness termed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Humoral immune responses likely play an important role in containing SARS-CoV-2, however, the determinants of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses are unclear. Methods: Using immunoassays specific for the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, we determined SARS-CoV-2-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in sera and mucosal fluids of two cohorts, including patients with quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR)-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (n = 56; median age 61 years) with mild versus severe COVID-19, and SARS-CoV-2-exposed healthcare workers (n = 109; median age 36 years) with or without symptoms and tested negative or positive by RT-qPCR. Findings: On average, SARS-CoV-2-specific serum IgA titers in mild COVID-19 cases became positive eight days after symptom onset and were often transient, whereas serum IgG levels remained negative or reached positive values 9-10 days after symptom onset. Conversely, patients with severe COVID-19 showed a highly significant increase of SARS-CoV-2-specific serum IgA and IgG titers as a function of duration since symptom onset, independent of patient age and comorbidities. Very high levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific serum IgA correlated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Interestingly, some of the SARS-CoV-2-exposed healthcare workers with negative SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA and IgG serum titers had detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA antibodies in their nasal fluids and tears. Moreover, SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA levels in nasal fluids of these healthcare workers were inversely correlated with patient age. Interpretation: These data show that systemic IgA and IgG production against SARS-CoV-2 develops mainly in severe COVID-19, with very high IgA levels seen in patients with severe ARDS, whereas mild disease may be associated with transient serum titers of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies but stimulate mucosal SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA secretion. The findings suggest four grades of antibody responses dependent on COVID-19 severity. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

9: The D614G mutation in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein reduces S1 shedding and increases infectivity
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Posted to bioRxiv 12 Jun 2020

The D614G mutation in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein reduces S1 shedding and increases infectivity
6,962 downloads microbiology

Lizhou Zhang, Cody B Jackson, Huihui Mou, Amrita Ojha, Erumbi S Rangarajan, Tina Izard, Michael Farzan, Hyeryun Choe

SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) isolates encoding a D614G mutation in the viral spike (S) protein predominate over time in locales where it is found, implying that this change enhances viral transmission. We therefore compared the functional properties of the S proteins with aspartic acid (SD614) and glycine (SG614) at residue 614. We observed that retroviruses pseudotyped with SG614 infected ACE2-expressing cells markedly more efficiently than those with SD614. This greater infectivity was correlated with less S1 shedding and greater incorporation of the S protein into the pseudovirion. Similar results were obtained using the virus-like particles produced with SARS-CoV-2 M, N, E, and S proteins. However, SG614 did not bind ACE2 more efficiently than SD614, and the pseudoviruses containing these S proteins were neutralized with comparable efficiencies by convalescent plasma. These results show SG614 is more stable than SD614, consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that viruses with SG614 transmit more efficiently. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

10: An integrated brain-machine interface platform with thousands of channels
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jul 2019

An integrated brain-machine interface platform with thousands of channels
6,941 downloads neuroscience

Elon Musk, Neuralink

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) hold promise for the restoration of sensory and motor function and the treatment of neurological disorders, but clinical BMIs have not yet been widely adopted, in part because modest channel counts have limited their potential. In this white paper, we describe Neuralink’s first steps toward a scalable high-bandwidth BMI system. We have built arrays of small and flexible electrode “threads”, with as many as 3,072 electrodes per array distributed across 96 threads. We have also built a neurosurgical robot capable of inserting six threads (192 electrodes) per minute. Each thread can be individually inserted into the brain with micron precision for avoidance of surface vasculature and targeting specific brain regions. The electrode array is packaged into a small implantable device that contains custom chips for low-power on-board amplification and digitization: the package for 3,072 channels occupies less than (23 × 18.5 × 2) mm3. A single USB-C cable provides full-bandwidth data streaming from the device, recording from all channels simultaneously. This system has achieved a spiking yield of up to 70% in chronically implanted electrodes. Neuralink’s approach to BMI has unprecedented packaging density and scalability in a clinically relevant package.

11: A SARS-CoV-2-Human Protein-Protein Interaction Map Reveals Drug Targets and Potential Drug-Repurposing
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Posted to bioRxiv 22 Mar 2020

A SARS-CoV-2-Human Protein-Protein Interaction Map Reveals Drug Targets and Potential Drug-Repurposing
6,717 downloads systems biology

David E Gordon, Gwendolyn M. Jang, Mehdi Bouhaddou, Jiewei Xu, Kirsten Obernier, Matthew J. O’Meara, Jeffrey Z. Guo, Danielle L. Swaney, Tia A. Tummino, Ruth Huettenhain, Robyn M. Kaake, Alicia L. Richards, Beril Tutuncuoglu, Helene Foussard, Jyoti Batra, Kelsey Haas, Maya Modak, Minkyu Kim, Paige Haas, Benjamin J. Polacco, Hannes Braberg, Jacqueline M. Fabius, Manon Eckhardt, Margaret Soucheray, Melanie J. Bennett, Merve Cakir, Michael J. McGregor, Qiongyu Li, Zun Zar Chi Naing, Yuan Zhou, Shiming Peng, Ilsa T. Kirby, James E. Melnyk, John S. Chorba, Kevin Lou, Shizhong A. Dai, Wenqi Shen, Ying Shi, Ziyang Zhang, Inigo Barrio-Hernandez, Danish Memon, Claudia Hernandez-Armenta, Christopher J.P. Mathy, Tina Perica, Kala B. Pilla, Sai J. Ganesan, Daniel J. Saltzberg, Rakesh Ramachandran, Xi Liu, Sara B. Rosenthal, Lorenzo Calviello, Srivats Venkataramanan, Jose Liboy-Lugo, Yizhu Lin, Stephanie A. Wankowicz, Markus Bohn, Phillip P. Sharp, Raphael Trenker, Janet M. Young, Devin A. Cavero, Joseph Hiatt, Theodore L. Roth, Ujjwal Rathore, Advait Subramanian, Julia Noack, Mathieu Hubert, Ferdinand Roesch, Thomas Vallet, Björn Meyer, Kris M. White, Lisa Miorin, Oren S. Rosenberg, Kliment A Verba, David A. Agard, Melanie Ott, Michael Emerman, Davide Ruggero, Adolfo García-Sastre, Natalia Jura, Mark von Zastrow, Jack Taunton, Alan Ashworth, Olivier Schwartz, Marco Vignuzzi, Christophe d’Enfert, Shaeri Mukherjee, Matt Jacobson, Harmit S. Malik, Danica Galonić Fujimori, Trey Ideker, Charles S. Craik, Stephen Floor, James S. Fraser, John D Gross, Andrej Sali, Tanja Kortemme, Pedro Beltrao, Kevan Shokat, Brian K. Shoichet, Nevan J. Krogan

An outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19 respiratory disease, has infected over 290,000 people since the end of 2019, killed over 12,000, and caused worldwide social and economic disruption[1][1],[2][2]. There are currently no antiviral drugs with proven efficacy nor are there vaccines for its prevention. Unfortunately, the scientific community has little knowledge of the molecular details of SARS-CoV-2 infection. To illuminate this, we cloned, tagged and expressed 26 of the 29 viral proteins in human cells and identified the human proteins physically associated with each using affinity-purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS), which identified 332 high confidence SARS-CoV-2-human protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Among these, we identify 67 druggable human proteins or host factors targeted by 69 existing FDA-approved drugs, drugs in clinical trials and/or preclinical compounds, that we are currently evaluating for efficacy in live SARS-CoV-2 infection assays. The identification of host dependency factors mediating virus infection may provide key insights into effective molecular targets for developing broadly acting antiviral therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 and other deadly coronavirus strains. * HC-PPIs : High confidence protein-protein interactions PPIs : protein-protein interaction AP-MS : affinity purification-mass spectrometry COVID-19 : Coronavirus Disease-2019 ACE2 : angiotensin converting enzyme 2 Orf : open reading frame Nsp3 : papain-like protease Nsp5 : main protease Nsp : nonstructural protein TPM : transcripts per million [1]: #ref-1 [2]: #ref-2

12: Convergent Antibody Responses to SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Convalescent Individuals
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Posted to bioRxiv 15 May 2020

Convergent Antibody Responses to SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Convalescent Individuals
5,991 downloads immunology

Davide F. Robbiani, Christian Gaebler, Frauke Muecksch, Julio C. C. Lorenzi, Zijun Wang, Alice Cho, Marianna Agudelo, Christopher O. Barnes, Anna Gazumyan, Shlomo Finkin, Thomas Hagglof, Thiago Y. Oliveira, Charlotte Viant, Arlene Hurley, Hans-Heinrich Hoffmann, Katrina G Millard, Rhonda G. Kost, Melissa Cipolla, Kristie Gordon, Filippo Bianchini, Spencer T. Chen, Victor Ramos, Roshni Patel, Juan Dizon, Irina Shimeliovich, Pilar Mendoza, Harald Hartweger, Lilian Nogueira, Maggi Pack, Jill Horowitz, Fabian Schmidt, Yiska Weisblum, Eleftherios Michailidis, Alison W. Ashbrook, Eric Waltari, John E Pak, Kathryn E. Huey-Tubman, Nicholas Koranda, Pauline R. Hoffman, Anthony P. West, Charles M. Rice, Theodora Hatziioannou, Pamela J. Bjorkman, Paul D. Bieniasz, Marina Caskey, Michel C. Nussenzweig

During the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 infected millions of people and claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. Virus entry into cells depends on the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S). Although there is no vaccine, it is likely that antibodies will be essential for protection. However, little is known about the human antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. Here we report on 149 COVID-19 convalescent individuals. Plasmas collected an average of 39 days after the onset of symptoms had variable half-maximal neutralizing titers ranging from undetectable in 33% to below 1:1000 in 79%, while only 1% showed titers >1:5000. Antibody cloning revealed expanded clones of RBD-specific memory B cells expressing closely related antibodies in different individuals. Despite low plasma titers, antibodies to three distinct epitopes on RBD neutralized at half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) as low as single digit ng/mL. Thus, most convalescent plasmas obtained from individuals who recover from COVID-19 do not contain high levels of neutralizing activity. Nevertheless, rare but recurring RBD-specific antibodies with potent antiviral activity were found in all individuals tested, suggesting that a vaccine designed to elicit such antibodies could be broadly effective. ### Competing Interest Statement In connection with this work The Rockefeller University has filed a provisional patent application on which D.F.R. and M.C.N are inventors.

13: Genome-wide CRISPR screen reveals host genes that regulate SARS-CoV-2 infection
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jun 2020

Genome-wide CRISPR screen reveals host genes that regulate SARS-CoV-2 infection
5,462 downloads genetics

Jin Wei, Mia Madel Alfajaro, Ruth E Hanna, Peter C DeWeirdt, Madison S. Strine, William J. Lu-Culligan, Shang-Min Zhang, Vincent R. Graziano, Cameron O. Schmitz, Jennifer S. Chen, Madeleine C. Mankowski, Renata B. Filler, Victor Gasque, Fernando de Miguel, Huacui Chen, Kasopefoluwa Oguntuyo, Laura Abriola, Yulia V Surovtseva, Robert C. Orchard, Benhur Lee, Brett Lindenbach, Katerina Politi, David van Dijk, Matthew D. Simon, Qin Yan, John G. Doench, Craig B Wilen

Identification of host genes essential for SARS-CoV-2 infection may reveal novel therapeutic targets and inform our understanding of COVID-19 pathogenesis. Here we performed a genome-wide CRISPR screen with SARS-CoV-2 and identified known SARS-CoV-2 host factors including the receptor ACE2 and protease Cathepsin L. We additionally discovered novel pro-viral genes and pathways including the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and key components of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Small molecule inhibitors of these pathways prevented SARS-CoV-2-induced cell death. We also revealed that the alarmin HMGB1 is critical for SARS-CoV-2 replication. In contrast, loss of the histone H3.3 chaperone complex sensitized cells to virus-induced death. Together this study reveals potential therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2 and highlights host genes that may regulate COVID-19 pathogenesis. ### Competing Interest Statement Yale University (CBW) has a patent pending related to this work entitled: 'Compounds and Compositions for Treating, Ameliorating, and/or Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection and/or Complications Thereof.' Yale University has committed to rapidly executable non-exclusive royalty-free licenses to intellectual property rights for the purpose of making and distributing products to prevent, diagnose and treat COVID-19 infection during the pandemic and for a short period thereafter. JGD consults for Foghorn Therapeutics, Maze Therapeutics, Merck, Agios, and Pfizer; JGD consults for and has equity in Tango Therapeutics.

14: Deep mutational scanning of SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain reveals constraints on folding and ACE2 binding
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jun 2020

Deep mutational scanning of SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain reveals constraints on folding and ACE2 binding
5,460 downloads microbiology

Tyler N. Starr, Allison J. Greaney, Sarah K. Hilton, Katharine H.D. Crawford, Mary Jane Navarro, John E Bowen, M. Alejandra Tortorici, Alexandra C. Walls, David Veesler, Jesse D. Bloom

The receptor binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein mediates viral attachment to ACE2 receptor, and is a major determinant of host range and a dominant target of neutralizing antibodies. Here we experimentally measure how all amino-acid mutations to the RBD affect expression of folded protein and its affinity for ACE2. Most mutations are deleterious for RBD expression and ACE2 binding, and we identify constrained regions on the RBD's surface that may be desirable targets for vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. But a substantial number of mutations are well tolerated or even enhance ACE2 binding, including at ACE2 interface residues that vary across SARS-related coronaviruses. However, we find no evidence that these ACE2-affinity enhancing mutations have been selected in current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic isolates. We present an interactive visualization and open analysis pipeline to facilitate use of our dataset for vaccine design and functional annotation of mutations observed during viral surveillance. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

15: Origin and cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses in China
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Posted to bioRxiv 31 May 2020

Origin and cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses in China
5,303 downloads evolutionary biology

Alice Latinne, Ben Hu, Kevin J Olival, Guangjian Zhu, Libiao Zhang, Hongying Li, Aleksei A Chmura, Hume E Field, Carlos Zambrana-Torrelio, Jonathan H Epstein, Bei Li, Wei Zhang, Lin-Fa Wang, Zheng-Li Shi, Peter Daszak

Bats are presumed reservoirs of diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) including progenitors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19. However, the evolution and diversification of these coronaviruses remains poorly understood. We used a Bayesian statistical framework and sequence data from all known bat-CoVs (including 630 novel CoV sequences) to study their macroevolution, cross-species transmission, and dispersal in China. We find that host-switching was more frequent and across more distantly related host taxa in alpha- than beta-CoVs, and more highly constrained by phylogenetic distance for beta-CoVs. We show that inter-family and -genus switching is most common in Rhinolophidae and the genus Rhinolophus. Our analyses identify the host taxa and geographic regions that define hotspots of CoV evolutionary diversity in China that could help target bat-CoV discovery for proactive zoonotic disease surveillance. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis suggesting a likely origin for SARS-CoV-2 in Rhinolophus spp. bats. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

16: Single-particle cryo-EM at atomic resolution
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Posted to bioRxiv 22 May 2020

Single-particle cryo-EM at atomic resolution
5,128 downloads biophysics

Takanori Nakane, Abhay Kotecha, Andrija Sente, Greg McMullan, Simonas Masiulis, Patricia M.G.E. Brown, Ioana T. Grigoras, Lina Malinauskaite, Tomas Malinauskas, Jonas Miehling, Lingbo Yu, Dimple Karia, Evgeniya V. Pechnikova, Erwin de Jong, Jeroen Keizer, Maarten Bischoff, Jamie McCormack, Peter Tiemeijer, Steven W Hardwick, Dimitri Y Chirgadze, Garib Murshudov, A. Radu Aricescu, Sjors H.W. Scheres

The three-dimensional positions of atoms in protein molecules define their structure and provide mechanistic insights into the roles they perform in complex biological processes. The more precisely atomic coordinates are determined, the more chemical information can be derived and the more knowledge about protein function may be inferred. With breakthroughs in electron detection and image processing technology, electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle analysis has yielded protein structures with increasing levels of detail in recent years. However, obtaining cryo-EM reconstructions with sufficient resolution to visualise individual atoms in proteins has thus far been elusive. Here, we show that using a new electron source, energy filter and camera, we obtained a 1.7 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction for a prototypical human membrane protein, the β3 GABAA receptor homopentamer. Such maps allow a detailed understanding of small molecule coordination, visualisation of solvent molecules and alternative conformations for multiple amino acids, as well as unambiguous building of ordered acidic side chains and glycans. Applied to mouse apo-ferritin, our strategy led to a 1.2 Å resolution reconstruction that, for the first time, offers a genuine atomic resolution view of a protein molecule using single particle cryo-EM. Moreover, the scattering potential from many hydrogen atoms can be visualised in difference maps, allowing a direct analysis of hydrogen bonding networks. Combination of the technological advances described here with further approaches to accelerate data acquisition and improve sample quality provide a route towards routine application of cryo-EM in high-throughput screening of small molecule modulators and structure-based drug discovery. ### Competing Interest Statement A.K., S.M., L.Y., D.K., E.V.P., E.d.J., J.K., M.B., J.M., and P.T are employees of Thermo Fisher Scientific.

17: Neuropilin-1 facilitates SARS-CoV-2 cell entry and provides a possible pathway into the central nervous system
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Posted to bioRxiv 07 Jun 2020

Neuropilin-1 facilitates SARS-CoV-2 cell entry and provides a possible pathway into the central nervous system
4,920 downloads microbiology

Ludovico Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ravi Ojha, Liliana D. Pedro, Minou Djannatian, Jonas Franz, Suvi Kuivanen, Katri Kallio, Tuğberk Kaya, Maria Anastasina, Teemu Smura, Lev Levanov, Leonora Szirovicza, Allan Tobi, Hannimari Kallio-Kokko, Pamela Österlund, Merja Joensuu, Frédéric A. Meunier, Sarah Butcher, Martin Sebastian Winkler, Brit Mollenhauer, Ari Helenius, Ozgun Gokce, Tambet Teesalu, Jussi Hepojoki, Olli Vapalahti, Christine Stadelmann, Giuseppe Balistreri, Mikael Simons

The causative agent of the current pandemic and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)[1][1]. Understanding how SARS-CoV-2 enters and spreads within human organs is crucial for developing strategies to prevent viral dissemination. For many viruses, tissue tropism is determined by the availability of virus receptors on the surface of host cells[2][2]. Both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a host receptor, yet, their tropisms differ[3][3]-[5][4]. Here, we found that the cellular receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1), known to bind furin-cleaved substrates, significantly potentiates SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, which was inhibited by a monoclonal blocking antibody against the extracellular b1b2 domain of NRP1. NRP1 is abundantly expressed in the respiratory and olfactory epithelium, with highest expression in endothelial cells and in the epithelial cells facing the nasal cavity. Neuropathological analysis of human COVID-19 autopsies revealed SARS-CoV-2 infected NRP1-positive cells in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In the olfactory bulb infection was detected particularly within NRP1-positive endothelial cells of small capillaries and medium-sized vessels. Studies in mice demonstrated, after intranasal application, NRP1-mediated transport of virus-sized particles into the central nervous system. Thus, NRP1 could explain the enhanced tropism and spreading of SARS-CoV-2. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest. [1]: #ref-1 [2]: #ref-2 [3]: #ref-3 [4]: #ref-5

18: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus – The species and its viruses, a statement of the Coronavirus Study Group
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Posted to bioRxiv 11 Feb 2020

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus – The species and its viruses, a statement of the Coronavirus Study Group
4,753 downloads microbiology

Alexander E. Gorbalenya, Susan C. Baker, Ralph S. Baric, Raoul J. de Groot, Christian Drosten, Anastasia A. Gulyaeva, Bart L. Haagmans, Chris Lauber, Andrey M Leontovich, Benjamin W Neuman, Dmitry Penzar, Stanley Perlman, Leo L.M. Poon, Dmitry Samborskiy, Igor A. Sidorov, Isabel Sola, John Ziebuhr

The present outbreak of lower respiratory tract infections, including respiratory distress syndrome, is the third spillover, in only two decades, of an animal coronavirus to humans resulting in a major epidemic. Here, the Coronavirus Study Group (CSG) of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, which is responsible for developing the official classification of viruses and taxa naming (taxonomy) of the Coronaviridae family, assessed the novelty of the human pathogen tentatively named 2019-nCoV. Based on phylogeny, taxonomy and established practice, the CSG formally recognizes this virus as a sister to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses (SARS-CoVs) of the species Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus and designates it as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). To facilitate communication, the CSG further proposes to use the following naming convention for individual isolates: SARS-CoV-2/Isolate/Host/Date/Location. The spectrum of clinical manifestations associated with SARS-CoV-2 infections in humans remains to be determined. The independent zoonotic transmission of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 highlights the need for studying the entire (virus) species to complement research focused on individual pathogenic viruses of immediate significance. This research will improve our understanding of virus-host interactions in an ever-changing environment and enhance our preparedness for future outbreaks.

19: Multi-level proteomics reveals host-perturbation strategies of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jun 2020

Multi-level proteomics reveals host-perturbation strategies of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV
4,716 downloads systems biology

Alexey Stukalov, Virginie Girault, Vincent Grass, Valter Bergant, Ozge Karayel, Christian Urban, Darya A. Haas, Yiqi Huang, Lila Oubraham, Anqi Wang, Sabri M. Hamad, Antonio Piras, Maria Tanzer, Fynn M Hansen, Thomas Enghleitner, Maria Reinecke, Teresa M. Lavacca, Rosina Ehmann, Roman Wölfel, Jörg Jores, Bernhard Kuster, Ulrike Protzer, Roland Rad, John Ziebuhr, Volker Thiel, Pietro Scaturro, Matthias Mann, Andreas Pichlmair

The sudden global emergence of SARS-CoV-2 urgently requires an in-depth understanding of molecular functions of viral proteins and their interactions with the host proteome. Several omics studies have extended our knowledge of COVID-19 pathophysiology, including some focused on proteomic aspects. To understand how SARS-CoV-2 and related coronaviruses manipulate the host we here characterized interactome, proteome and signaling processes in a systems-wide manner. This identified connections between the corresponding cellular events, revealed functional effects of the individual viral proteins and put these findings into the context of host signaling pathways. We investigated the closely related SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV viruses as well as the influence of SARS-CoV-2 on transcriptome, proteome, ubiquitinome and phosphoproteome of a lung-derived human cell line. Projecting these data onto the global network of cellular interactions revealed relationships between the perturbations taking place upon SARS-CoV-2 infection at different layers and identified unique and common molecular mechanisms of SARS coronaviruses. The results highlight the functionality of individual proteins as well as vulnerability hotspots of SARS-CoV-2, which we targeted with clinically approved drugs. We exemplify this by identification of kinase inhibitors as well as MMPase inhibitors with significant antiviral effects against SARS-CoV-2. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

20: Neuropilin-1 is a host factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Jun 2020

Neuropilin-1 is a host factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection
4,677 downloads cell biology

James L Daly, Boris Simonetti, Carlos Antón-Plágaro, Maia Kavanagh Williamson, Deborah K. Shoemark, Lorena Simón-Gracia, Katja Klein, Michael Bauer, Reka Hollandi, Urs F. Grebera, Peter Horvath, Richard B. Sessions, Ari Helenius, Julian A Hiscox, Tambet Teesalu, David A. Matthews, Andrew D. Davidson, Peter J. Cullen, Yohei Yamauchi

SARS-CoV-2 is the causative agent of COVID-19, a coronavirus disease that has infected more than 6.6 million people and caused over 390,000 deaths worldwide. The Spike (S) protein of the virus forms projections on the virion surface responsible for host cell attachment and penetration. This viral glycoprotein is synthesized as a precursor in infected cells and, to be active, must be cleaved to two associated polypeptides: S1 and S2. For SARS-CoV-2 the cleavage is catalysed by furin, a host cell protease, which cleaves the S protein precursor at a specific sequence motif that generates a polybasic Arg-Arg-Ala-Arg (RRAR) C-terminal sequence on S1. This sequence motif conforms to the C-end rule (CendR), which means that the C-terminal sequence may allow the protein to associate with cell surface neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2) receptors. Here we demonstrate using immunoprecipitation, site-specific mutagenesis, structural modelling, and antibody blockade that, in addition to engaging the known receptor ACE2, S1 can bind to NRP1 through the canonical CendR mechanism. This interaction enhances infection by SARS-CoV-2 in cell culture. NRP1 thus serves as a host factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection, and provides a therapeutic target for COVID-19. ### Competing Interest Statement The authors have declared no competing interest.

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